News for the ‘Events’ Category

December 4th at Book Court

The Salon: Literary Women

Guest Curated by She Writes & Hedgebrook Writers Retreat

Book Court

163 Court Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Tel: (718) 875-3677

Tue Dec 4, 7:00PM

Talking women writers with some wonderful women writers with Hedgebrook, She Writes and Goddard connections.  Come join us!

Moderated by Holly Morris

Lisa Dierbeck

Rahna Reiko Rizzuto

Martha Southgate

Amy Wheeler

Lisa Dierbeck is the author of the novels The Autobiography of Jenny X and One Pill Makes You Smaller, a New York Times Notable Book. In 2010, she co-founded Mischief+Mayhem, an independent publisher run by established authors in association with OR Books. The New York Observer has dubbed it “the book industry’s new danger brigade.” Frequently anthologized and twice nominated for a Pushcart Prize, her work has appeared in numerous literary journals and in such publications as The Boston Globe, O, the Oprah Magazine, The New York Times Book Review and Time Out New York.

Rahna Reiko Rizzuto’s memoir, Hiroshima in the Morning, is a National Book Critics Circle Finalist, among other honors. She is the author of Why She Left Us, an American Book Award Winner, a U.S./Japan Creative Artist Fellow, Hedgebrook alumna, and a faculty member at Goddard College. Rizzuto has appeared widely in the media, including The Today Show, The View, 20/20, The Joy Behar Show, MSNBC-TV and PBS-TV. Her articles have been published internationally.

Martha Southgate is the author of four novels. Her newest, The Taste of Salt, was published in September 2011 and was named one of the best novels of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle and the Boston Globe. She has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the Bread Loaf Writers Conference. Her essay “Writers Like Me,” published in the New York Times Book Review, appears in the anthology Best African-American Essays 2009. Previous non-fiction articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, O, Entertainment Weekly, and Essence.

Amy Wheeler is a playwright and the Executive Director of Hedgebrook, a retreat and residency for women writers on Whidbey Island that supports women writers whose stories and ideas shape our culture now and for generations to come. Amy holds an MFA from the Iowa Playwrights Workshop, and her work has been seen in New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, and Atlanta.

Holly Morris, co-founder of PowderKeg, is a writer and editor, and a television documentary producer and correspondent. The former Editorial Director of the book publishing company Seal Press, Morris edited an eclectic list of titles on topics ranging from domestic violence and geo-politics, to award-winning poetry and international fiction and nonfiction. She also edited the Adventura imprint, which features outdoor, travel, and environmental literature. She is a longtime board member of Hedgebrook, a writer’s residency in Washington State. Her essays are widely anthologized, and she writes for numerous publications including The New York Times. Her book, Adventure Divas: Searching the Globe for a New Kind of Heroine, based on her experiences as an international correspondent, was named an “Editors’ Choice” and a ‘Notable Book of the Year’ about exploration by the New York Times. Morris is the executive producer/writer/director of the award-winning prime-time PBS documentary series, “Adventure Divas”

September 8th – Tea and readings

“For a ceramic artist, form is a vessel for the spirit.  Fire – volatile and sacred in many cultures – is the alchemy that brings it alive.  The artist’s intentions, finger marks, and dreams all ignite in the kiln.   When we invite hand-made art into our everyday lives – in our morning coffee, our afternoon tea with friends – we find the stillness and beauty of the present moment: meditative, ritualistic, reverential, and sacred.”   – Ming Yuen-Schat 

On September 8th, at 2 pm, we are reading and drinking from an art exhibit – Chalice – which includes 100 porcelain and celadon vessels of different shapes and sizes.  Pick your favorite right off its velvet pad, turn it in your hands, have a cup of tea.  Sit back and listen to readings from Ed Lin, Anelise Chen and me as we reflect on sacredness and spirituality in our society.

While you are there, visit 50 artists’ studios as part of the Brooklyn Museum’s Go Project.  Preview the Asian American Arts Alliance’s Locating the Sacred Festival.  For the full day’s program at the NARS studios in Brooklyn, check out this flyer.

The New York Art Residency & Studios (NARS)Foundation  

88 35th Street, Brooklyn, NY, 3rd Floor

(Take the D, N, R to 36th St.)

For further information, please contact info@narsfoundation.org or 718-768-2765.

www.narsfoundation.org

 

Books Are Weapons in the War of Ideas

I love this idea.  And this wonderful festival has already begun.  I will be reading and having a conversation about Country and Conflict tomorrow afternoon.  Join us.  The full schedule is here.

 

Posted: July 27th, 2012
Categories: Events, Hiroshima in the Morning, Our Nuclear Age
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Her Story

We talked about reinvention, and revision.  About a different ending, and about how sometimes, when you don’t know who this voice in your head is, all you have to do is ask.  We discussed picking a cold place for a story, going to Paris, and passing: passing up, passing for, passing through. We did some math: What is love plus freedom in your book, and what does love minus freedom equal?

We had a wonderful day in Baltimore, Bernice McFadden, Jacqueline Luckett, Leila Cobo, Linda Duggins and I.  It was an encounter made possible in part by Joy Bramble, publisher of the Baltimore Times whose earlier chance encounter with Linda Duggins began with “My feet were killing me…”. Many thanks to the Enoch Pratt Library, Judy Cooper, and everyone who supported the event, who came, who asked questions.

At one point, an audience member got up and gave us an amazing gift.  She had read every book, and she told us what she learned from each one and the reasons why she will never be the same person as she was before she read them.  Thank you, Ella Curry, for your words.

Love plus freedom: math I never had to do in school.

What does love plus freedom mean to you?

Here I come, Baltimore

The DC Examiner wraps up a series on all the International Women’s History Month panelists today with a short article on me.  If you can’t make it, check out the series to see what you are missing.  Thank you, Wendy Coakley-Thompson!

Rizzuto is passionate about the power and cultural significance of storytelling in general and women’s stories in particular. “Storytelling – as humans but especially as women – is our way to build consensus and community, and the more truthful we are when we stand up and say ‘This is who I am, this is what I believe, or what I did,’ the stronger and more beautiful that community will be,” she declares.

Continue reading on Examiner.com Rahna Reiko Rizzuto prescribes storytelling as an antidote to historical silence – Washington DC Publishing Industry | Examiner.com

 

Posted: March 10th, 2012
Categories: Events, Hiroshima in the Morning, The Writing Life
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Coming to Baltimore

 

Looking forward to talking about women’s history this Saturday – the history of family, love, loss, death, community, and not the machinations of conquering countries.

For more information, here’s a lovely preview in the Baltimore Times.

“Hiroshima in the Morning” forces the reader to contemplate memory, history and personal truth. Rizzuto says she hopes it encourages readers to discover, “What’s important to you, so you can stand on the mountain top and you can say what happened. This is my story.”

And a link to the topic and the amazing writers who will be joining the panel with me.  See you here:

March 10, 2012:

International Literary Festival
1:00 pm until 4:00 pm.
Enoch Pratt Free Library
400 Cathedral Street

Baltimore MD

Transformation – from life to memoir

At our last residency for the Goddard MFA in Creative Writing in Vermont, we had three amazing and successful alumni return to talk to our current students.  Mary Johnson, author of An Unquenchable Thirst: Following Mother Teresa in Search of Love, Service, and an Authentic Life, spoke with Kenny Fries and me about the pitfalls and pleasures of crafting a resonant, universal story from our daily “here’s what happened next” life.  We spoke for over a hour, and I am pleased to be able to share it with you here.

Here’s a sample from the beginning:

My question (one of many!) to Mary:  “There are those things we are afraid of…that we don’t want to relive.  Could you talk about what you left out of your memoir, and why, and how you got what you did onto the page?”

Mary: “Fear was a big thing for me…putting it down on the page for anybody to see was really scary.  Kenny was my advisor for my first two semesters at Goddard.  I had written a few things…  During one particular packet, I started to write the sex stuff.  And it was really hard for me.  I wrote this piece and I sent it off, and when I came back from the post office, I wrote Kenny an email and said, ‘I just sent my packet to you, please don’t open it.  I will send you another one.’ And he wrote me back and said, ‘Oh! So at last you have finally written something worthwhile!’”

2012.01.11 Transformation From Personal Experience to Published Memoir from Goddard College on Vimeo.

International Women’s History Month Literary Festival

Looking forward to a March 10th discussion in Baltimore on “the intersection of place, time and culture in literature and in the lives of women” with four amazing women:

Leila Cobo, a Fulbright scholar from Cali, Colombia, novelist, pianist, TV host, and executive editor for Latin content and programming for Billboard. She is considered one of the country’s leading experts on Latin music. She is the author of Tell Me Something True. Her second novel, The Second Time We Met (Grand Central Publishing), will be released February 29, 2012. (www.leilacobo.com)

Jacqueline Luckett, author of Searching for Tina Turner and the newly published Passing Love (Grand Central Publishing). She participated in the Voices of Our Nations (VONA) writing workshops and, in 2004, formed the Finish Party along with seven other women writers-of-color. (www.jacquelineluckett.com)

Bernice L. McFadden, author of seven critically acclaimed novels, including Sugar and Glorious. She is a two-time Hurston/Wright Legacy Award finalist. In her new novel, Gathering of Waters (Akashic Books), McFadden brings her own vision to the story of Emmett Till and the town of Money, Mississippi. (www.bernicemcfadden.com).

Linda A. Duggins, moderator from the Hachette Book Group.

More details here

The Pen Fall Literary Tasting

Come join me at Westbeth for an evening of readings, conversation and cocktails.

Westbeth

With Henry ChangHal FosterMichael GreenbergLev GrossmanKevin HolohanSabina MurrayRahna Reiko RizzutoStephen Stark, and other special guests

What should you be reading this season? Hear from Sarah McNally of McNally Jackson Books about the runaway hits, the beloved secrets, and the must-reads of the 2011 fall season. Then wander the halls of Westbeth to attend live readings in the homes of Westbeth residents by some of the most exciting authors writing today. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to explore the oldest and largest artist community located in the heart of bohemian West Village, repurposed by renowned architect Richard Meier into 383 living and working lofts. The evening ends with a reception and cocktails.

When: Thursday, November 17, 2011
Where: Westbeth, 155 Bank St., New York City
What time: 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10. Purchase at ovationtix.com or at the door

Blast from the Past

Here is an interview I did with Rachel Glass for Evergreen Radio/WTBBL in Seattle last year, before the motherhood explosion, when the conversation was really about Japan and the atomic bomb and writing.  It’s quite interesting to go back in time.  When Rachel and I sat down, we discovered, of all things, that her parents knew my parents in the old days in Hawaii.  It is, especially in the islands, a very small world.

The MP3 link is here.